Events

Aussies won’t receive full refunds for Tokyo Olympics tickets

Sports fans around the world will lose at least 20 per cent of their money when they receive a refund from cancelled Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games ticket packages.

Earlier this month, it was revealed that the rescheduled Tokyo Olympics, which were set to run in 2020, will go ahead without international spectators due to COVID-19.

Despite such a directive banning spectators from around the world attending the event coming from the Japanese government, would-be Australian spectators will not receive full refunds on their ticket packages, the games’ authorised ticket reseller, CoSport, said in a statement.

The US-based company said that it will not refund a 20 per cent handling fee, which for some fans means hundreds or even thousands of dollars down the drain.

CoSport, which holds a monopoly over ticket sales that is reportedly encouraged by the International Olympic Committee, attributed its decision to the organisers of the Tokyo Olympics refusing to cover this portion of the refund.

A subsidiary of CoSport, JetSetSports has been responsible for reselling tickets and hotel packages for Australians at the Tokyo Olympics. Like its parent, it will not refund the full cost of packages.

Refunds will also be delayed “up to the third quarter of this year”, CoSport said, adding that organisers will only refund face value plus shipping costs.

Ticket costs, however, only make up a fraction of the cost of packages, with refunds for other expensive components of the Olympic ticket packages, like hotel accommodation, tours and hospitality, still to be determined.

But CoSport’s heavy-handedness over its process for ticket refunding has come under scrutiny (and not for the first time), with its statement detailing that it will only give customers under two weeks to request a refund.

This comes despite the company telling its customers that they won’t receive their refund until Tokyo Olympics organisers return funds, which “will take up to the third quarter of this year.”

The Australian Olympic Committee is a contractual partner with CoSport in Olympics ticket resales, but reportedly has no say in the terms the company enforces on its customers.

In a statement to The Australian, the AOC said it is working with Co­Sport to effect a refund for Australian ticket buyers who purchased tickets for the Games.

“The AOC acknowledges there will be an administrative charge for these tickets, reflective of costs incurred due to the impact of the pandemic,” it said.

The news comes after the Tokyo Olympics were postponed on 24 March last year, amid the height of the coronavirus pandemic.

Originally billed as the ‘recovery games’, the Tokyo Olympics would have aimed to show Japan’s recovery following the devastating 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, a message that took a back seat after the arrival of COVID-19.

The event, without the world to witness it in-person, will now be tinged with the aftermath of the COVID-19 outbreak.

“It’s a different story now,” Satoko Suzuki, a professor at Hitotsubashi University’s School of International Corporate Strategy in Tokyo, told Bloomberg last year.

“They originally wanted to show Japan is back on track.”


Featured image source: iStock.com/voyata



SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Tourism

ATEC tickled pink with Labor Party tourism funding promise

As professional journalists, we at Travel Weekly remain completely unbiased when it comes to political matters. However, we’re just going to leave this here…

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

“The time is right”: industry legend, Barry Mayo, retires after 60+ years in travel

We think we speak for everyone when we say we can’t imagine an Australian travel industry without this industry stalwart!

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Tourism Western Australia partners with AAT Kings and showcases WA wildlife to Sydney

Rumours are that part of the collaboration deal is that the AAT execs all get free camel rides whenever they want, which we completely understand.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Humans of Antarctica

Travel Weekly joined Aurora Expeditions for an Antarctic circle expedition and met some amazing travellers who waited over two years for the adventure.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Flight Centre scores whopping government contract

Work for Flight Centre? Your tax dollars could now be contributing to your own salary, according to our vague understanding of the ATO.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Start-up airline, Bonza, to embrace Uber model

However, it’s not yet confirmed whether the pilots will be willing to give life advice to drunk passengers, like the rideshare app.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Midweek Catch-up with UnCruise Adventures’ Kirsty Bozlee

We’re not sure how to UnCruise… and when we asked the company’s vice president of operations, she thought we were joking.

Share

CommentComments

Events

Travel DAZE to feature Aussie film premiere!

We’ve got another spate of fabulous speakers to announce for Travel DAZE 2022 as well as a surprise big reveal.

Share

CommentComments

Conferences

PHOTOS: ATE goes off with a bang

If you’re like one unlucky Travel Weekly reporter who has COVID, these pics will help you live vicariously through the conference-goers.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Qantas’ new long-haul flights could cost over $18,000

For this price, we’d hope that the flights come with a complimentary mani-pedi and a pet bunny called “Fluffy” to keep us company during the flight.

Share

CommentComments

News

Returned special events to hit Seoul this month

The Travel Weekly criteria for what makes an event special is whether they have Tim Tams – although we can make exceptions for international events.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

Intrepid debuts its first all-female leadership team

Rumour has it, Beyoncé’s Run the World (Girls) could be heard blasting from Intrepid’s Australia office moments after they announced this news.

Share

CommentComments