Tourism

One in three tourism businesses face extinction within next three months: TTF

One in three tourism businesses could be forced to close within the next three months, according to new research released by the Tourism and Transport Forum (TTF).

A national survey of over 500 businesses – from both tourism and other sectors – conducted by Newgate Research for TTF, has painted a grim picture of the sentiment among travel-dependent businesses compared to other industries after what has effectively been an 18-month lockdown for the nation’s visitor economy.

The research revealed 41 per cent of businesses that rely on tourism feel things will get worse over the next three months, while almost a third (29 per cent) believe their outlook is bleak for at least the next 12 months.

It also shows that 70 per cent of tourism businesses surveyed are exploring other activities or revenue streams, considering reducing staff hours (69 per cent) or scaling down their operations (62 per cent) over the next three months.

Twenty per cent plan to take even more drastic action and shut their doors, while another 10 per cent said they will sell up.

“Tourism business have made it clear that as other sectors recover, they still foresee a challenging period ahead not only in the short term, but for the next year or more,” said TTF chief executive Margy Osmond.

“It’s not like we are expecting an ‘open sesame’ moment where everything returns to normal, and travel hesitancy will linger for both the leisure and corporate travel markets as long as Australians feel they are at the mercy of policymakers playing border ‘roulette’ and while quarantine requirements remain in place.

“In the long term, there is a real fear that major and high yield inbound markets outside of the US and UK, such as Asia and parts of Europe, will remain directly shut off to Australia for some time until they are deemed as safe countries by the federal government and quarantine-free travel opens up for double-vaccinated tourists.

“Many internationally reliant tourism operations in places like Cairns and Uluru, in tourism growth states like South Australia and Tasmania and in the struggling CBDs of Melbourne and Sydney will simply be unable to pivot their products and offerings to save their businesses and will need further government support.

“It will take a combination of concerted and strategic international engagement and investment by state and federal governments to reattract key aviation routes, while at the same time providing targeted financial support for internationally reliant tourism operators so that they can stay afloat during this time.

“TTF will continue to raise this issue as a priority with governments so that tourism does not become the collateral damage of the Australian economy in the wake of the post-COVID economic recovery.”


Featured image source: iStock/urbancow



SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Conferences

PHOTOS: ATE goes off with a bang

If you’re like one unlucky Travel Weekly reporter who has COVID, these pics will help you live vicariously through the conference-goers.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Qantas’ new long-haul flights could cost over $18,000

For this price, we’d hope that the flights come with a complimentary mani-pedi and a pet bunny called “Fluffy” to keep us company during the flight.

Share

CommentComments

Returned special events to hit Seoul this month

The Travel Weekly criteria for what makes an event special is whether they have Tim Tams – although we can make exceptions for international events.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

Intrepid debuts its first all-female leadership team

Rumour has it, Beyoncé’s Run the World (Girls) could be heard blasting from Intrepid’s Australia office moments after they announced this news.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

“Bounce back and inspire”: Collette to host key players in Cairns

We’re headed to sunny Cairns this week to rub shoulders with travel’s big wigs at Collette’s annual big bash. See you there!

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

REVIEW: Hôtel La Pérouse offers a taste of classic French resort life

by Ali Coulton

Hôtel La Pérouse exemplifies Nice’s resort lifestyle offering privacy and quiet luxury on France’s Cote d’Azur.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Yas Island Abu Dhabi’s new tourism ad names Kevin Hart its chief island officer

Some of the staff at Travel Weekly are trying to become the chief island officer of Australia, but Scomo isn’t returning our emails.

Share

CommentComments

Technology

“Australia is a terrific market for cruising!”: Expedia’s Greg Schulze on how agents can maximise their business

We chatted with one of the big wigs at Expedia during its recent gathering in Vegas. Sadly, he declined our invite to join us for a game of blackjack, but that’s probably for the best.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Globetrotting tour operator arrested following drug drop death

The man also auditioned for Survivor in 2019 and featured in an Indonesian TV commercial – just in case the title wasn’t chaotic enough already.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Travel to make full recovery before end of 2024, says Virtuoso’s Fiona Dalton

Dalton hosted media at Crown Sydney this morning to celebrate Matthew Upchurch’s return to Aus. Our roving journalist managed to take down this story in between courses.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Hawai‘i Tourism Oceania celebrates the ‘Month of Lei’ with incredible new famil offer

by Sponsored by Hawai'i Tourism Oceania

This year, Hawai‘i Tourism Oceania is celebrating ‘Month of Lei’ 2022 with a virtual trade event and the launch of a new famil incentive.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

PONANT announces new 2023 sailing expeditions in the Kimberley

This ship is so fancy that they put ‘le’ in front of the name just to show they’re not messing about.

Share

CommentComments