Aviation

Engineers find another flaw in Boeing’s 737 MAX jet

Boeing engineers have reportedly discovered another flaw in the 737 MAX jet, which was grounded early last year after two fatal crashes.

The aircraft manufacturer said that it had identified an issue involving two bundles of wiring, which control the aircraft’s tail, as part of a “rigorous” inspection process.

According to media reports, engineers found that the wiring had been installed close enough together to be at threat of causing a short circuit, which risked sending the plane out of control.

Boeing is now reportedly “working with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to perform the appropriate analysis”. According to The Australian, the company has not decided whether any change is required in the aircraft’s design.

This latest blow comes not long after Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg resigned amid the 737 MAX drama.

Boeing reverses position on the need for simulator training

Boeing on Tuesday said that it is “recommending 737 MAX simulator training in addition to computer-based training for all MAX pilots” prior to the jet’s return to service.

The 737 MAX has been grounded worldwide since March following two fatal plane crashes involving Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines, which killed a combined 346 people.

The manufacturer’s statement comes in spite of long maintaining that simulator training was not needed by pilots to fly the plane, one of its main drawcards as a cost-saver for airlines.

Moreover, Southwest Airlines, which has ordered 280 737 Max jets, reportedly made its first order in 2011 based on the promise that the airline wouldn’t have to educate its pilots on simulators, by Boeing. In initial negotiations with Southwest during the development of the jet, Boeing reportedly agreed that if training was required, it would give the carrier a discount of US$1 million per jet.

According to The New York Times, the decision stems from Boeing’s analysis of recent flight simulator tests. These were reportedly part of the work necessary to return the Max to service, which showed that pilots were not using the right procedures to handle emergencies.

“Safety is Boeing’s top priority,” interim Boeing CEO Greg Smith said.

“Public, customer and stakeholder confidence in the 737 MAX is critically important to us and with that focus Boeing has decided to recommend MAX simulator training combined with computer-based training for all pilots prior to returning the MAX safely to service.”

The aircraft manufacturer has also confirmed the reassignment of 3,000 workers, as it halts the production of the 737 MAX, the possibility of which was announced in December.

Most of these employees reportedly work at Boeing’s Renton, Washington plant where the 737 Max is manufactured. Others are at Boeing’s South Carolina operations facility.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Travel Agents

Flight Centre showcases agents’ expertise (and unveils new captains) in first-ever global brand campaign

A new captain and co-captains, a fresh tagline, a new microsite and a TikTok account – Skroo and his team sure didn’t muck around with Flight Centre’s first global campaign.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Experience Co expands portfolio with two big acquisitions

After getting its house in order and navigating its way through COVID, the ASX-listed company has made a couple of very big plays.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Royal Caribbean names new sales boss for Australia and NZ

After pulling a Michael Jordan and coming out of retirement, the much-loved and well-respected Peter McCormack is once again hanging up his boots at Royal Caribbean.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Air Canada introduces new refund policy for COVID-affected flights

And, in good news for agents, you can hold on to your loonies, with the Canadian carrier confirming it won’t recall any sales commissions on refunded tickets that it processes.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

AAT Kings to relaunch #EmptyEsky series with new trips

Travel Weekly’s esky is usually full of beers. However, we’d happily drink them all to be ready for these new trips.

Share

CommentComments

Events

“So disappointing”: Bali-themed festival forced to apologise, issue refunds and offer free entry

Organisers of a festival aiming to quench the thirst of Aussies who would rather be in Bali right now appear to have missed the mark by quite a bit.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

ScoMo “in no hurry” to reopen Australia’s international borders

It appears the likelihood of more travel bubbles being announced soon is about the same as ScoMo’s beloved Sharkies winning the NRL Premiership this year … not good.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

YIPPEE! Two-way trans-Tasman bubble finally kicks off

Today is the day, folks! As of midnight last night, the two-way trans-Tasman bubble is FINALLY open! Get the lowdown on NZ flights and tour discounts right here.

Share

CommentComments

Technology

“Do not trust the GPS”: Google Maps places rural town 85km north of its actual location

According to the mayors of a handful of rural Aussie towns, this isn’t the first time the popular travel app has caused problems for them.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

“We call it the triple win”: Global Work & Travel launches new affiliate program

Have you been searching for ways to earn some much-needed moolah ever since JobKeeper ended? Here’s one that doesn’t involve busking on the street or spinning signs.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

CLIA to welcome 18 new ships with virtual showcase

The association is bringing you all the latest vessel news from the maritime world with this exclusive showcase.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

GM appointed to lead Best Western’s newest Aussie hotel

Australia’s newest luxe boutique hotel has named its GM who, according to the accompanying press photo, has a strong beard game.

Share

CommentComments