Tourism

Revealed: What travel companies fear most about climate change

Ali Coulton

Ali Coulton

New research has revealed tourism brands greatest fears when it comes to climate change.

As reported by Skift surveys conducted by UK climate nonprofit, the CDP, asked public and private companies around the world to describe risks they believe are associated with climate change.

See also: How climate change will affect your client bookings

The results paint a stark picture of the impact climate change will have on the industry including intense heat, widespread damage to infrastructure and disruption of food and water supply.

While we may think of this as something to deal with in the near future, some companies listed these impacts as current issues, particularly those in hurricane or drought affected areas.

Istock/CHUYN
Istock/CHUYN

Skift highlights a few examples from the research: AccorHotels and Hilton are most worried about droughts and inadequate water supply, while American and Japan airlines point to the hazards of increased cyclones and hurricanes.

However, not everyone is concerned about the effects of climate change. Ireland’s largest hotel company, Dalata Hotels reported it perceived no significant risks.

Each year, thousands of companies disclose environmental data (including risks, opportunities, impacts and actions) through CDP’s questionnaires.

CDP then gives each company a score against a diverse range of metrics to give them a letter grade on climate change, forests and/or water security.

See also: GSTC Chair Luigi Cabrini: “Tourism must be a leader in responding to climate change”

For example, Marriott got a C for its work combatting climate change while Scandic Hotels got an A-.

The highest graded airlines were Delta and United, both scoring a B grade, while American and Japan Airlines were given a D.

You can check out all of CDP’s rating here.

The potential risk cited by most hotels was drought and inadequate water supply, followed by hurricanes and cyclones, which was the risk most airlines cited.

Hotels also reported concerns about flooding, rising sea levels, higher mean temperature, extream heat or cold, disturbed food supply, wildfires and decreased snowfall.

Airlines listed increased precipitation, flooding in airports, high winds, snow and ice, volcanic eruptions, lower air density and heavy fog.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

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