Technology

An app for last minute adventures

Kate Webster

Leezair, an Australian technology startup has created an app that allows people to experience their surroundings more often and more conveniently.

Leezair acts as a pocket guide, suggesting, directing and connecting you with experiences around you while you’re on the go.

Leezair has launched as a web application for travellers and locals in Australia, this pilot launch will soon be followed by the Leezair mobile app and marketplace. These apps are the first of their kind in the Australian market. They are an example harnessing the power of technology to help push forward an industry that has been left behind.

The app aims to bring people closer to experiences that they are likely to love. When we decide to travel we have access to many apps and platforms that help us plan and prepare for our trip, but what helps us when we arrive in our destination? Accommodation is sorted, transport and flights are confirmed, but do we really want to book activities and tours in advance without knowing what the weather will be like, or how accessible they are? No we don’t.

Head of Operations, Calvin Lee, said the tourism industry has long been aware of the unmet consumer need for a mobilebased platform that facilitates last minute bookings in real time. Lee said that no one has been able to successfully work out the solution.

“Mobile bookings have been growing by 1% every quarter in Australia since well before 2012. This complemented with the fact that over 50% of bookings are made within 7 days of the activity date means
that Leezair has a real opportunity here.”

The unique value of Leezair, is that when you arrive at your destination, the app knows exactly where you are, what activities you can do around you, and whether they are suitable for the weather conditions right now. If you have booked with Leezair before, it even knows what kind of activities and experiences you would prefer to do, and so presents these first. This effective use of artificial intelligence and machine learning means that travellers can now spend less time searching for things to do, and more time experiencing.

leezair_mobile_app_preview

Recent research on consumer spending and booking behaviour demonstrates that most travellers prefer to book activities last minute once they arrive at their chosen destination, even though the current system still pushes them to book advance.

Leezair is enabling travellers and locals to see what’s available nearby while they are on the go. The app also provides users with information to enable them to decide what to do based on their current circumstances. The usercentric approach is expected to increase volume for activity and tour providers by putting their services directly into the pockets and hands of travellers.

Angus Vidor said that the tourism industry is being held back by slow moving agents resisting technology, high commission rates and accessibility barriers.

“Consumers have not just moved online, they have moved to mobile. The travel industry has tried to apply the flights and airlines model to tours and activities, but activity providers cannot keep up with the high commission rates and competition. This has left the market ripe, but suppliers dry.”

Leezair is the first company in Australia to apply advanced technology to create a predictive platform that is tailored to each user’s travelling style while suggesting things to do based on weather, friend reviews and realtime availability.

Vidor said that the web application is a very small piece of the grand vision for Leezair: “Our mobile app will bring the technology that is used by Uber, Tinder and Spotify to the tourism industry by using artificial intelligence to understand the individual and offer them unique travel suggestions.”

The apps that Leezair is creating are expected to make it easier for travellers to experience the world around them by bringing them closer to activities that they are likely to enjoy. The location aware and last minute functionality will encourage locals to become more involved and active in their own surroundings. The startup expects that locals will welcome the Leezair app into their free time and boost local tourism.

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