Tourism

Mount Everest turns into world’s highest rubbish dump

Laine Fullerton

The iconic Mount Everest site is turning into what looks like a dumping ground, as photographs have emerged showing the amount of waste that visitors are leaving in their trail.

And there is nothing better to sum up our reaction to this news, than the following GIF.

angry GIF

According to News.com, locals fear it is becoming the world’s highest rubbish dump.

Seasonal climber Pemba Dorje Sherpa, who has summitted the mountain 18 times, told AFP she is disgusted with the rubbish fellow climbers are leaving behind.

“It’s disgusting, an eyesore. The mountain is carrying tonnes of waste.”

Experienced climbers are pointing fingers at inexperienced visitors as the main culprits for the rubbish dumping.

In some group tour situations, clients rely on guides to carry their gear, making it difficult for them to carry down rubbish on top of this.

As per News.com, Damian Benegas, who has been climbing Everest for over 20 years, said: “They [guides] have to carry their client’s gear so they are unable to carry down the rubbish.”

Most rubbish is located at the ‘death zone’, with items like ropes, tents, discarded oxygen and cooking gas cylinders, beer cans, and even faeces being left behind.

Because there are no toilets at the four camps along the way, climbers usually bury their faeces, but with flocks of climbers scaling the peak each year, the waste begins to accumulate.

Exposed faeces also poses a huge threat for the spread of disease.

Last year the Nepalese government implemented a law requiring all climbers scaling Mount Everest to bring back 8 kilograms of rubbish under rules designed to clean up the peak.

Those who fail to meet these requirements do not receive a return on their $4000 rubbish deposit, a very small amount in comparison to the cost of climbing Mount Everest which can range from $27,000 to $135,000.

According to the Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee (SPCC), in 2017 climbers brought down nearly 25 tonnes of trash and 15 tonnes of human waste, the equivalent of three double-decker buses.

However, the waste problem is not only escalating because of the current dumping habits of climbers, but also due to the fact that the glaciers are continuing to melt and therefore uncovering litter that was previously hidden over decades.

With at least 600 people having climbed Mount Everest this year, particularly over the peak season in April and May, the SPCC hopes to send around 100-tonnes of materials to be recycled in 2018.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

One response to “Mount Everest turns into world’s highest rubbish dump”

  1. Just under 1,000 people attempt to climb Everest each year. This includes a combination of clients, professional climbers, Sherpa’s and other guides. Take out the Sherpa’s and guides, and let’s say half are clients and prof. climbers (500 pax). It costs at least 30k, often closer to $45k, to attempt the climb. Why not charge each of them a poultry $150.00 “rubbish tax” (call it what you will), and you’d have $75k each year to clean up the rubbish they leave behind. Simple surely?!

Leave a Reply

Tourism

“Not clear where it goes next”: UK’s COVID battle helps ScoMo’s international travel argument

While some might have hoped the G7 leaders’ summit would prompt Australia’s PM to change his tune on international travel, it appears to have had the opposite effect.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

GTI appoints new GM of marketing and strategy, snares fresh client

The tourism marketing agency has bounced out of the long weekend and into the working week with a couple of big announcements.

Share

CommentComments

Events

Brisbane moves one step closer to securing 2032 Olympics

After the Maroons’ dismal performance last week, at least this will give Queenslanders something to cheer about.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Accor kickstarts massive local recruitment drive, launches city-focused campaign

Fancy a gig at the French hospitality giant? Well, it might be time to update the old CV, with more than 1,000 vacant roles waiting to be filled.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

MSC unveils new luxury cruise line

Are your clients the type who drive a Range Rover, shop at Gucci and eat caviar on toast for breakfast? Satisfy their expensive taste with this.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Give your clients a taste of Malaysia’s buzzing foodie scene

by Sponsored by Tourism Malaysia

For something a little more off the beaten track, Malaysia is a treasure trove for immersive and mouth-watering food experiences, rooted in the country’s rich trading history.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

IN PICTURES: Check out Southeast Asia’s thriving street art hub

by Sponsored by Tourism Malaysia

ATTN urban adventurers: did you know that Malaysia is home to some of the most Instagrammable street art in the world?

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Paradise awaits: How to island-hop down Malaysia’s east coast

by Sponsored by Tourism Malaysia

Give your clients a taste of tropical paradise with an island-hopping trip down Malaysia’s east coast.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Ancient rainforests and cool getaways: Why Malaysia’s hidden highlands are the perfect post-pandemic reprieve

by Sponsored by Tourism Malaysia

From bustling Southeast Asian streets and island getaways to ancient rainforests and highland retreats, Malaysia is full of surprises.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Visit the cultural melting pot of Southeast Asia

by Sponsored by Tourism Malaysia

If your clients are seeking a Southeast Asian escape packed with cultural experiences, delicious food, island adventures and breathtaking natural scenery, we have two words for you: Malaysia awaits.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Company behind Helloworld agencies placed into liquidation

by Huntley Mitchell

Despite the efforts of administrators to keep it afloat, the company couldn’t sustain enough cash flow to survive.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Rex scraps break-even forecast for FY21, as Melbourne lockdown bites

The airline’s bean counters have been forced to revisit their FY21 guidance with a red pen.

Share

CommentComments