Destinations

Elders call for Uluru-style climb ban on Sunshine Coast mountains

Indigenous elders from the Sunshine Coast are calling for an Uluru-style climbing ban on the Glasshouse Mountains.

The region’s Jinibara people have been fighting for two decades to put an end to the climbing of Mount Beerwah, the highest of the Glasshouse Mountains, which is considered a sacred site and “mother” to the rest of the range, according to 7News.

“It’s the mother mountain. It is a sacred site. It’s where the birthing places were, that’s the main thing, not for people to climb and take videos up,” Senior elder of the Jinibara people Ken Murphy told the The Courier-Mail.

“You see the climbers with their lightweight gear drilling into her and scarring the mountain.

“People climb up her for photos and ‘yahoo and carry on’. A lot aren’t culturally aware and we can’t stop them.”

The Kabi Kabi people have also called for Mount Coolum, which is located about an hour north of Mount Beerwah, to be closed to climbers.

Kabi Kabi elder Les Muckan, whose family are the traditional owners of Mount Coolum, told the The Courier-Mail he is against people climbing the mountain not only because it is sacred but also due to safety concerns. Seven people have been rescued from the mountain’s walking track this year alone.

“Every rescue costs taxpayer money and the rescued people are the lucky ones – what happens if someone climbs up and are not so lucky?” he said.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk told the The Courier-Mail the government has no plans to close the climbs.

“The Department of Environment and Science as land managers consult with traditional owners on a regular basis on the best way to protect culturally significant sites such as the Glasshouse Mountains,” she said.

“While traditional owners have raised concerns and suggested the possibility of closing the mountains to climbers, the department has no plans to do so.”

Murphy said traditional owners requests are falling on deaf ears and fears he is fighting a losing battle.

Climbing Uluru was officially banned on Saturday, after months of tourists flocking to the sacred site ahead of its closure.

Traditional owners of the site, the Anangu people celebrated alongside guests such as Midnight Oil frontman Peter Garrett, Goanna frontman Shane Howard, Environmental Minister Sussan Ley and four federal labor MPs including indigenous politicians Linda Burney, Pat Dodson, Malarndirri McCarthy.

The Anangu people have been vocal about their wishes for people not to climb Uluru since the 1980s not just because of its spiritual significance but also the physical dangers of the climb.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Cruise

Regent Seven Seas breaks bookings record with 2022/23 Voyage Collection

Need proof that travellers are still keen to cruise? Check out this champagne-popping moment from a luxury cruise line’s collection release.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Go on a safari in Sri Lanka from the comfort of your own couch

Couch potatoes, rejoice! You can take a tour of some of Sri Lanka’s most wild national parks from the comfort of your lounge room.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Women from 10 flights taken for invasive medical examinations in Qatar, says Australia’s Foreign Affairs Minister

More troubling details have emerged over the Qatar airport incident involving a number of Australian women.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Tasmania plans to reopen to NSW from early November

by Christian Fleetwood

Have your NSW clients been yearning for a quarantine-free trip to Tasmania? Well, they can consider this an early Christmas present from Premier Gutwein.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Qantas and Virgin announce new Aussie routes

Tell your clients to pack their bags, because the two airlines have added a range of new local routes, reintroductions and expanded services.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Life in the time of COVID-19 with YTL Hotels’ Luke Hurford

We caught up with YTL Hotels’ senior vice president of strategy to find out how he’s been faring during the pandemic. However, it was hard to hear him through the layer of snow he keeps on his face.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

“GREAT SUCCESS”: Kazakhstan cashes in on new Borat film in latest tourism campaign

In some very nice news for Sacha Baron Cohen fans, it looks like Borat’s home country has finally decided to accept him… sort of.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Plane passenger slaps flight attendant after refusing to wear a mask

Just in case you need another reason to hate anti-maskers, have a geeze at this video of an unruly passenger’s shocking behaviour.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Princess Cruises pushes back its pause on local sailings

Meanwhile, Travel Weekly has extended its pause on office drinks after a particularly bad incident involving a pot plant and copious amounts of slivovitz.

Share

CommentComments

Road & Rail

TUNE IN: New TV show to highlight Australia’s ‘Roads Less Travelled’

Get the popcorn ready and watch the client inquiries roll in, because Network 10 is debuting a new show that places domestic travel front and centre.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

Globus and Cosmos launch new Australian and NZ tours

This press release was accompanied by a couple of bottles of wine from the good folk at GFOB, and Travel Weekly’s editor is already on the seocnd one, so please excuse any typos.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

“Offensive, grossly inappropriate” vaginal examinations of female plane passengers reported to Australian Federal Police

The federal government is demanding answers from the relevant authorities, after 13 Australian women were forced to undergo invasive medical examinations at an international airport.

Share

CommentComments