Technology

People the “most important” part of a digital tech strategy, says Jetstar’s digital chief

Huntley Mitchell

Huntley Mitchell

It may sound weird, but Jetstar’s head of digital and delivery believes people are the most important element of a successful digital technology strategy.

Speaking at the Travel Tech. Summit 2019 in Sydney last week, Simon Pearce said Jetstar approaches its digital tech strategy like an old Einstein quote: “Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.”

The budget airline’s strategy is made up of five Ps: platforms (modular, decoupled components offering a specified service to internal or external customers), people, (capability, resourcing and training), process (ways of working designed to promote efficient and sustainable delivery of customer value), product (customer offering, value and experience – the why, what and when), and personalisation/data (building great customer engagement).

For Pearce, people is the “most important” part of any digital technology strategy, but he admitted that finding decent talent is not a walk in the park for Jetstar.

“Effectively being in Asian organisation, we have offices throughout Asia in Singapore, Ho Chi Minh City, Tokyo, and Melbourne where our head office is,” he explained.

“One thing I can assure you though is that at all of these locations, it is very difficult to get good talent. The competition for talent is just as heavy in Singapore and China and Ho Chi Minh as it is in Sydney and Melbourne.”

Jetstar’s Simon Pearce speaking at the Travel Tech. Summit 2019

Pearce said it is crucial for organisations developing a digital tech strategy to identify how they attract and retain the right talent.

“Having worked in the banking industry seven years prior, I didn’t realise until I joined the travel industry how nice it is to work in an industry where the topic you’re talking about on a day-to-day basis for work is interesting,” he said.

“It’s much more interesting sitting around talking about holidays than it is about credit cards – that’s one of the selling points that we as an industry need to use to attract and retain talent.”

It works well for us because you find that people who are interested in working in travel are typically a little bit adventurous, they’re often outgoing, and they’re often quite social. All those elements work really well in terms of creating a cohesive and efficient team.

“You need people who are willing to take risks, you need people who are willing to do things a little bit differently, and you need people who are willing to be a little bit outspoken.”

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Destinations

British town gets influx of hilarious fake reviews after politician breaks lockdown for a visit

Barnard Castle’s TripAdvisor page has been inundated with fake reviews poking fun at a British political advisor who seemingly broke lockdown laws. 

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

PM the latest to pressure states over border closures, as Qld premier fires back at Tourism Minister

by Christian Fleetwood

ScoMo also talked up the potential of Australians travelling across the Tasman Sea, as the country emerges from COVID-19 restrictions.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

“Lets get out there”: Matt Cameron-Smith talks domestic tourism boom and agents’ role in “de-risking” travel

by Ali Coulton

The AAT Kings group CEO also shed some light on The Travel Corporation’s plan to add more domestic trips across its brands.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

STUDY: Qantas among Australia’s most-trusted brands during lockdown

Despite its wings being clipped by the COVID-19 pandemic, Qantas has still managed to maintain its status as one of Australia’s most-trusted brands.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Dozens of mammoths discovered under future Mexico City airport

Do you consider yourself a bit of a modern-day Howard Carter or Gertrude Bell? If so, this story will definitely tickle your archeological fancy.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Cruise Wrap: PONANT’s new training module, Evergreen’s red-hot offers + MORE

If this week’s Cruise Wrap is anything to go by, the sector is pushing for its return in a big way, rewarding agents in the process.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

ATIC and ATEC launch COVID-safe programs for SMEs

Two of Australia’s industry bodies have developed practical support for businesses during the coronavirus pandemic. However, that’s not to say they copied each other’s ideas.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Life in the time of COVID-19 with Bench Africa’s Cameron Neill

This week, we chat with Bench Africa’s general manager about spicy food, Cirque de Soleil soundtracks and how to potty train a two-year-old.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

John O’Sullivan on Experience Co.’s reset, travel’s recovery and Westbury’s “appalling” comments

by Huntley Mitchell

Travel Weekly has gone one-on-one with Experience Co. CEO and former Tourism Australia boss John O’Sullivan. As in interview him – not verse him in an online game of chess or Battleship.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Labor senator calls for corporate watchdog to investigate Rex

Rex is facing a possible probe from Australia’s corporate watchdog, after its deputy chairman revealed plans for the airline to expand capital city services without informing the ASX.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Australian Border Force extends cruise ban by three months

Those of you who had clients ready and raring to sail out by mid-June may want to prepare a stiff drink before reading this.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Hotel investor Jerry Schwartz proposes helipad for Sofitel Darling Harbour

The prominent Aussie hospitality identity has launched the bold proposal to help revive Sydney’s tourism and conventions profile.

Share

CommentComments