Technology

MH370’s final moments pieced together in new documentary

Ali Coulton

National Geographic has traced the final moments of missing flight MH370 in its documentary series, Drain the Oceans.

The series, which details the secrets that lie in the world’s oceans, worked closely with Perth-based Electric Pictures and the Australian Transport Safety Bureau for the episode and is the only documentary team to be given such access to the investigation.

According to Newshub, experts recreated what may have happened to the plane using the latest data from underwater systems and expert opinions.

Electric Pictures CEO and executive producer Andrew Ogilvie told News Corp the footage in the documentary is like nothing ever seen before.

Drain The Oceans uses a range of data — from bathymetric sonar scans to video footage and photogrammetry — with sophisticated computer-generated graphics to create highly accurate three-dimensional models of the bottom of our oceans, lakes and rivers,” Ogilvie said.

“This process allows the filmmakers to recreate natural wonders, shipwrecks, ancient ruins and other human artefacts that can be found on the sea floor — revealing them in unprecedented detail, as if they were on dry land.”

According to Drain the Oceans, the plane suffered fuel starvation in it’s right engine, causing the plane to make a hard left turn after autopilot kicked in to compensate for the imbalance. The plane’s other engine is thought to have failed shortly after.

Source: National Geographic via Newshub
Source: National Geographic via Newshub

Once both engines were gone, autopilot shut down and the aircraft engaged in a “long spiral descent”.

Last month Malaysian investigators released their final report on the disappearance of the flight, concluding they had not been able to determine the cause of the plane’s disappearance.

However, what they were able to determine was that the plane was manually turned around mid-air, cancelling out speculation that it had been under control of autopilot. The report also concluded that “unlawful interference by a third party” could not be ruled out.

Since then, a French airline authority has taken up an investigation to “verify the authenticity” of the technical data used in the investigation.

MH370 went missing on 8 March 2014 with 239 people on board, while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. The flight is thought to have changed course shortly after leaving Malaysian airspace, flying for more than six hours with its navigation systems turned off before plunging into the Indian Ocean.

The plane’s disappearance has since turned into one of the largest underwater search operations in history, turning up no results besides three wing fragments.

Featured image source: National Geographic via News Corp

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Travel Agents

Flight Centre granted loan extension

There was reportedly a great deal of cheering and yahooing coming from Skroo’s office this morning. Discover the cause here.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Travelling family cop jail time over fake illness claims against tour operator

These halfwit travellers posted pics of themselves enjoying their holiday on social media, and even gave positive feedback about their trip via a survey, despite claiming to be ill.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Your ultimate agent guide to WA’s Margaret River region

by Sponsored by Tourism Western Australia

Have you always pretended to know everything about the Margaret River region to your clients, despite having never actually been there? Continue the facade with this.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Marriott to more than double all-inclusive portfolio through new deal

Just like the waistline of Travel Weekly’s editor, Marriott’s all-inclusive portfolio of hotels and resorts is expanding.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Meet Rob, the world’s first humanoid robotic bartender at sea

Do you live in fear that one day you will be replaced in your job by a robot? Well, if you’re a bartender on a cruise ship, sadly that day has arrived.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

ACCC backs reauthorisation of Qantas-American Airlines alliance

It looks like Alan Joyce and Doug Parker will be buying each other anniversary gifts for the next few years.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

Topdeck responds to allegations of “alarming and unscrupulous corporate conduct”

by Ali Coulton

Topdeck has come under fire from a few customers over what they are claiming to be some dodgy rebooking tactics by the Flight-Centre-owned brand.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

REVEALED: The top-selling souvenir from every country in the world

From camel hair rugs and daggers, to marionettes and worry beads, this study has uncovered exactly which souvenirs travellers are most likely to come home with.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Event Hospitality & Entertainment creates new collection of independent hotels

The company has a new brand for its indy hotels to sit under, which is held up by four pillars (metaphorically speaking, of course).

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

New executive officer appointed for Cultural Attractions of Australia

Do you happen to work at Cultural Attractions of Australia and have recently noticed a fresh face wandering the office hallway? Discover their name and more here.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Aurora Expeditions to launch new Aussie voyages for domestic travellers

The Aussie-owned cruise company is getting ready for a new and unique domestic travel program, which will kick off in June.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

IN PICTURES: Virgin Australia unveils “lounge of the future” at Adelaide Airport

Much to Travel Weekly’s disappointment, the new lounge doesn’t feature robot butlers. However, it does have plenty of bright greenery and ambient lighting.

Share

CommentComments