Destinations

Last climbers almost denied, prime minister scorned: Uluru climb’s final hours

Climbing Uluru has finally been outlawed, after months of tourists flocking to the rock ahead of its closure.

The final climbers were almost denied entry after rangers were forced to close the chain rail due to strong winds on the western face of the rock.

However, the wind died down and tourists ran towards the sacred site, each ignoring the sign that details why climbing disrespects the traditional owners.

“Uluru is sacred to our culture. It is a place of great knowledge. Under our traditional law climbing is not permitted,” the sign reads, citing the Anangu traditional owners.

“This is our home. As custodians, we are responsible for your safety and behaviour. Too many people do not listen to our message. Too many people have died or been hurt causing great sadness.

“We worry about you and your family. Please don’t climb.”

Following the closure, there was a party open to all held as the sun went down over Uluru on Sunday, according to SBS.

The Anangu people celebrated alongside guests such as Midnight Oil frontman Peter Garrett, Goanna frontman Shane Howard, Environmental Minister Sussan Ley and four federal labor MPs including indigenous politicians Linda Burney, Pat Dodson, Malarndirri McCarthy.

Dodson called out prime minister Scott Morrison for his notable absence.

“Well I would’ve thought that the Prime Minister should’ve been attending this occasion. I saw him at the basketball somewhere in Australia,” Dodson told NITV.

“If he had a real empathy with the religious and cultural foundations of the First Nations of this country he should’ve been here.

“The Prime Minister should’ve been at this event and showing respect for First Nations across Australia, but particularly with the Anangu, who have been generous in how they’ve shared this place, and to highlight the importance of Aboriginal culture and spirituality across Australia.”

Finally unchained

The chain, which was the only safety precaution in place for climbers, is expected to be dismantled today along with a series of white markings that point to a cairn at Uluru’s summit.

The man who laid the chain 56 years ago, Peter Severin told the ABC he thinks it will be back in a few years.

He said the chain was not supposed to be a safety measure but was built to reassure climbers and that removing it is a “stupid idea”.

“I think it’s a stupid idea personally, and I wouldn’t mind thinking if I live long enough in a couple of years’ time, they’ll reopen it with a little kiosk at the bottom, where they make people pay to climb the rock, and they’ll put another one up. That’s my opinion,” he said.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Wholesalers

Aussie wholesaler expands to New Zealand

Staff at an Aussie wholesaler are beginning to work phrases like “choice bro”, “sweet as” and “chur” into their vocabulary upon receipt of this news.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Coronavirus: Diamond Princess passengers die, as two evacuated Aussies test positive

The coronavirus outbreak continues to wreak havoc on the travel industry, prompting the federal government to extend its travel ban for another week.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Sydney Airport CEO pleased with “resilient” full-year results

by Huntley Mitchell

Geoff Culbert has remained upbeat about the company’s full-year results against what he says were “some of the toughest trading conditions we’ve seen since the financial crisis”.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Experience Co. swings to $7.1 million first-half loss

by Huntley Mitchell

The ASX-listed company has fallen into the red in the first half of the 2020 financial year, with “unfavourable” weather conditions partly to blame.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Daredevil completes heart-stopping tightrope walk above Hawaiian hotel

A world-renown high-wire walker has made history by completing a tightrope walk between two hotel towers 15 storeys up.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

JAL celebrates two years of Melbourne-Tokyo route by issuing snowboards as boarding passes

Aussie snowboarders looking to shred the slopes of Japan this snow season now have another reason to book their trip.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Agent Wrap: Visit USA Expo wraps up, Uniworld’s Night of Nights, Silversea rewards agents + MORE!

Get a load of all the smiling faces featured in this week’s Agent Wrap! You’ll be smiling too when you see all the deals and famil offers.

Share

CommentComments

Technology

Webjet and Cover-More form new travel insurance partnership

In other news, Travel Weekly’s editor and deputy editor are currently forming a formidable partnership at the crease in the office cricket tournament.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Flavour of the Week: SIA’s senior management changes, Accor’s new comms director + MORE!

This week’s flavour is tangy with a hint of fresh industry appointments. Or maybe that’s just the salt and vinegar chips Travel Weekly’s editor was eating while he proofread this article.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Influencer visits IKEA store, fools followers into thinking she’s in Bali

This savvy influencer somehow convinced her followers she was in Indonesia when, in reality, she just took a trip to her local furniture store.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

ACCESS DENIED: Excite’s booking platform is now closed

by Huntley Mitchell

Were you planning on retrieving some booking info from Excite Holidays’ platform? Well, unfortunately you’ve left it too late.

Share

CommentComments

Road & Rail

Road & Rail Wrap: DriveAway’s new call centre, Amtrak Vacations sale + MORE!

Yes, it’s our weekly dose of news covering all things on the railway tracks and on the road. We’ve even gone off-road for this wrap!

Share

CommentComments