Cruise

WORLD FIRST: NSW port to provide renewable energy for cruise ships

One of Sydney’s oldest ports, the Bays Port, will be the site of the world’s first 100 per cent renewable energy shore powered shipping precinct.

Minister for Transport and Veterans, David Elliott, said Bays Port, which includes Glebe Island and White Bay, will be the first bulk shipping precinct fully supplied by shore power.

Dry bulk ship at Glebe Island | Supplied

The White Bay Cruise Terminal will also be the first shore powered cruise berth in the Southern Hemisphere.

“Our Government is creating the ports of the future and in doing so transforming the communities in which they continue to operate,” Elliott said.

“The first berth is set to come online in 2024, and will allow shore power capable ships to cut their diesel generators, and thereby reducing emissions, air pollution and noise levels whilst at port.

“Shore power is cleaner and quieter, minimising the impact of ships on neighbouring areas and ensuring our last remaining deep water harbour berths continue to operate sustainably into the future.”

In the Bays Port area alone, renewable shore power will remove up to 14,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere over 12 months, the equivalent of taking over 4,000 cars off our roads every year.

The Port Authority of NSW CEO, Captain Philip Holliday, announced the net zero and shore power plan with the support of bulk shipping and cruise industry leaders.

“This is an historic partnership with the Port Authority of NSW investing over $60 million to deliver this infrastructure as the first step, with port users already pledging to
retrofit and build ships to take advantage of this technology,” Holliday said.

“Delivering shore power will drive us even further than our already ambitious NSW net zero targets, of a 75 per cent emissions reduction by 2030 and be net zero by 2040.”

Carnival Australia joined the Port Authority of NSW and signed a letter on intent for cruise ships using White Bay Terminal to connect to shore power derived from this renewable energy.

Marguerite Fitzgerald, president of Carnival Australia and P&O Cruises Australia, said a number of factors made shore power at White Bay an attractive solution.

“Importantly, P&O, as one of the major users of the White Bay Cruise Terminal, now has a fleet comprised entirely of shore power ready ships,” Fitzgerald said.

“Particularly significant is that the Port Authority is accessing 100 per cent certifiable renewable energy for its shore power capability.

“Carnival Australia is part of a global organisation that has achieved ambitious sustainability goals and continues to set strong targets. It has a proud record of embracing environmentally friendly technology including advanced air quality systems and pioneering the introduction of LNG-powered cruise ships.”

Using shore power involves infrastructure that provides shoreside electrical power while a ship is berthed eliminating the need for it to operate fuel-burning auxiliary engines.

It is not a new concept and dates back to when ships were run by coal-fired engines that were constructed with iron.



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