Destinations

Travel trends: The changing nature of adventure travel

Ali Coulton

Adventure travel usually conjures up images of daredevil figures in Kathmandu gear, scaling mountains and eating scorpions.

But what people often ignore is the subjective nature of feeling adventurous.

For us, it’s adventurous to buy our morning coffee from anywhere that isn’t our local. But for you, it could be anything from four-wheel driving through the bush, to trecking through Bolivian mountain ranges.

This is why adventure travel is so difficult to characterise. Lucky for us, The Intrepid Group have given it a red hot go in their Adventure Travel Index, which aims to challenge stereotypes of adventure travellers and redefine the growing sector.

“In the past 29 years, we’ve seen the word ‘adventure’ used in many different contexts – from adrenaline to ‘soft adventure’.” Intrepid Travel co-founder Darrell Wade said.

“We also encounter people daily that declare they’re “not adventurous” – when in fact, it is completely relative to an individual. What’s adventurous to one person isn’t necessarily adventurous to the next.”

The Adventure travel index asked 1,000 Aussies who they define adventure travel. Here’s what they said:

intrep

According to Intrepid, adventure travel caters to all appetites, and ideas of adventure range from mild to wild. The survey asked respondents to name their most adventurous holiday, and for some, the most adventurous thing they’ve done was simply getting on a plane to go overseas. At the other end of the spectrum, respondents answered that trekking through Africa or hitchhiking through Asia was their idea of adventure.

For Aussies looking for adventure in our own backyard, the Northern Territory was by far the most frequently mentioned, specifically Uluru, Kata Tjuta, Kakadu and Alice Springs.

China also rated high for Aussies, with many walking the Great Wall, eating crickets and climbing a mountain.

Many people also rated trying new foods and taking public transport as the most adventurous thing they’ve done.

Living in Sydney and dealing with Cityrail on a regular basis, we can sympathise with this one.

Survey respondents were also looked at what motivates us to go book adventure holidays. Here’s how Aussies responded:

intrep1

An overwhelming majority of respondents said they book adventure travel as a way to recharge and relieve stress, followed by the age-old classic; itchy feet.

“Anecdotally, we are experiencing more travellers booking an Intrepid adventure with us to mark a special occasion like a milestone birthday or anniversary,” said James Thornton, CEO of Intrepid Group.

“This makes total sense as doing something new, and in some cases getting outside of your comfort zone, is the perfect way to put a stamp on personal occasions.”

To smash any generalisations you had left, the survey also married Intrepid’s top destinations to three Australian age groups (18-29, 30-45 and 46 and over) and found that popularity of adventure destinations is fairly equally spread.

intrep3

 

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Destinations

Russia approves controversial COVID-19 vaccine

by Christian Fleetwood

It’s a monumental achievement – one that could mean international travel is closer than ever before, right? Well, we wouldn’t recommend holding your breath.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Royal Caribbean posts $2.3 billion quarterly loss, but 2021 bookings “trending well”

by Huntley Mitchell

With its global cruise operations having been suspended since March, Royal Caribbean’s quarterly results come as no surprise.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

“I Blame”, “Coal Village” and “Jumpsuit”: Visit Mexico site accidentally gives literal translations for destinations

Have you done something embarrassing at work recently? Take comfort in knowing it almost definitely wasn’t as bad as this gaffe by whoever is in charge of translating Visit Mexico’s webpage.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Private charter airline offers flights to Antarctica on board Qantas Dreamliner

by Christian Fleetwood

The first couple of flights to the frozen continent are set for a November take-off, with travel agents encouraged to get selling.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Marriott’s RevPAR falls more than 80pc in Q2, but CEO notes “steady signs” of demand returning

by Huntley Mitchell

Here’s yet another serving of dour financial results from a hotel giant, this time with a dash of optimism.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Cruise Wrap: MSC’s Mediterranean return, Silverseas’ new expeditions + MORE

This week’s Cruise Wrap is one of our longest yet, with enough information to fill the Pacific Ocean. Or maybe just the Tasman Sea. It will fill your kitchen sink, at least.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Get your skills verified with AFTA’s new Micro Credentials Program

Fancy adding some shiny new credentials, or verifying your existing skills? Here’s a quick and easy way to get there.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

CATO granted access to utilise ‘Safe Travels’ protocols

Unsure what this good news means for you as a CATO member? All is explained here for you, thanks to Travel Weekly’s copying and pasting of a press release.

Share

CommentComments

Technology

“Very difficult” second quarter sees Amadeus limp to $324m half-yearly loss

by Huntley Mitchell

Amadeus boss Luis Maroto has been forced to pause the order of a new leather chair and credenza for his office after announcing the company’s half-yearly financials.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Life in the time of COVID-19 with Bench Africa’s Bonnie-Sue O’Garey

This week, we went on a virtual safari with Bench Africa’s state manager for NSW and the ACT. And by that, we mean we looked at YouTube videos of elephants while we interviewed her.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Northern Territory’s border measures to remain for “at least” 18 months, says Chief Minister

Were you lining up a Christmas jaunt to the Top End for your clients in the hope that the NT’s border restrictions will be relaxed by then? Well, beware of this deflating news.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Two key players shielded from Ruby Princess inquiry

The special inquiry into Ruby Princess will have to report without being able to question two key federal officers who helped clear the cruise ship.

Share

CommentComments