Aviation

Tickets for Qantas’ epic seven-hour scenic flight sell out in 10 minutes!

Huntley Mitchell

Huntley Mitchell

Those still hoping to nab a seat on Qantas’ special scenic flight will be bitterly disappointed, with tickets selling out in a flash.

The seven-hour joy flight, which will fly above the Northern Territory, Queensland and New South Wales, was offered in response to strong demand from frequent flyers who miss the experience of flying, according to Qantas.

And the airline wasn’t kidding about the strong demand, with all tickets sold out in 10 minutes of becoming available at midday today!

According to Qantas’ website, 104 economy tickets were available at $787 each, 24 premium economy tickets were available at $1,787 each and 6 business-class tickets were available at $3,787 each.

“We knew this flight would be popular, but we didn’t expect it to sell out in 10 minutes,” A Qantas spokesperson told Travel Weekly.

“It’s probably the fastest-selling flight in Qantas history.

“People clearly miss travel and the experience of flying. If the demand is there, we’ll definitely look at doing more of these scenic flights while we all wait for borders to open.”

The ‘Great Southern Land’ scenic flight will take off on Saturday 10 October from Sydney, operated by a Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which is usually reserved for long-haul international flights, and features the biggest windows on any passenger aircraft.

Using similar configuration as its scenic flights over Antarctica, Qantas’ ‘Great Southern Land’ flight will feature low-level flybys of some of the Australia’s most iconic landmarks including Uluru, Kata Tjuta, the Whitsundays, Gold Coast, Byron Bay and Sydney Harbour.

Celebrating the Great Southern Land of Australia, the flight will feature a Neil Perry menu, a gift bag and a pre-flight auction of memorabilia from Qantas’ recently-retired fleet of 747s.

“Just six months ago, we would have never imagined not being able to jump on a plane and visit family interstate or take a holiday internationally,” Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce said.

“While we may not be able to take you overseas right now, we can certainly provide inspiration for future trips to some of Australia’s most beautiful destinations. We could be on the cusp of a domestic tourism boom, given international borders are likely to be restricted for some time.

“So, many of our frequent flyers are used to being on a plane every other week and have been telling us they miss the experience of flying as much as the destinations themselves.

“Australia is a great land and home to unique wonders like Uluru and the Whitsundays, so we know that it will be truly special to experience this beautiful country from the comfort and freedom of the sky.

“This flight, and possibly more like it, means work for our people, who are more enthusiastic than anyone to see aircraft back in the sky.”

The Great Southern Land scenic flight will be carbon offset and operate on a cost-neutral basis. Qantas Fly Well procedures will apply pre-departure and inflight.



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