Tourism

The one mistake you don’t want to make on schoolies

We all know how important travel insurance is, right? Answer: super important.

But according to new research from Smartraveller and Understand Insurance, this knowledge apparently comes with age – because thousands of year 12 graduates will travel to South East Asia for schoolies without travel insurance at all.

The poll, conducted by Quantum Market Research, shows one in five young Australians head to SE Asia without insurance. And 75 per cent of young travellers engage in risky behaviours that are unlikely to be covered, even if they did have insurance.

Lisa Kable, spokesperson for understandinsurance.com.au, said that those travelling to SE Asia will likely ride motorbikes and drink alcohol, which most travel insurance policies don’t cover

“Thousands of teenagers are finishing their final exams and are on their way to popular destinations in SE Asia, including Bali and Thailand. Many will overindulge in alcohol. Some may take illicit drugs. And many will ride a motorbike or scooter or take part in an adventure sport or activity.

“The insurance industry and the Australian Government’s Smartraveller program are concerned about the number of young Australians who will be injured overseas, without the cover of insurance, during this Schoolies break.

“Teens and their families need to be aware of the importance of holidaying with the right travel insurance. The Australian Government does not pay for medical treatment or emergency flights home if something goes wrong, despite 25 per cent of travellers wrongly believing the Government will assist with medical and related costs.

“They should understand they may not be covered by their insurance if they make a claim for an event caused by alcohol, drugs, use of a motorbike or failing to declare a pre-existing medical condition.”

SE Asian destinations including Bali attracted more than 10,000 teens last year and the Indonesian island is one of the top four destinations for Australian deaths overseas.

“The right travel insurance is a necessity. Families should discuss not just the destination but the activities their teens will be engaging in on their holiday.

“There are hundreds of travel insurance policies on the market, so choosing a policy that covers the destinations and the activities is of utmost importance,” Kable added.

The ICA and Smartraveller encourage all Schoolies and their parents to read the travel advice on Smartraveller.gov.au before they leave Australia and subscribe to receive travel updates or follow Smartraveller on social media.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

One response to “The one mistake you don’t want to make on schoolies”

  1. …. claim for an event caused by alcohol, drugs, use of a motorbike or failing to declare a pre-existing medical condition are not covered by insurance at all…… now you know why young people don’t bother to get one…

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