Aviation

Qantas pilots go above union to prevent Project Sunrise take-off

New reports have revealed Qantas’ Project Sunrise plans are being thwarted by a group of rebellious pilots.

According to The Australian Financial Review, Qantas pilots are side-stepping the Australian and International Pilots Association (AIPA) in a secret bid to hinder the airline’s plans for ultra-long-haul flights from Australia’s east coast to London and New York.

The Flying Kangaroo plans to introduce the North Atlantic services from 2023, but remains in negotiations over pay and conditions.

A company email from Qantas International chief executive Tino La Spina last week said the airline could bring in new pilots for Project Sunrise if staff failed to approve the industrial agreement currently in front of AIPA.

“It’s become clear that Sunrise is something that our international business needs to maximise its long-term success and defend its competitive position,” La Spina said, as reported by AFR. “It is time to make decisions.”

Qantas is dissatisfied with negotiations with AIPA over the latest enterprise bargain agreement, of which Project Sunrise is a major part, La Spina said.

As such, the flag carrier is reportedly prepared to bypass the union entirely and offer terms directly to pilots.

“We will continue good faith negotiations with AIPA on the package as a whole – including non-Sunrise components,” La Spina said.

“But, if we can’t reach in-principle agreement with them very soon, we will offer a package like the one outlined above directly to you in March, so that you have the opportunity to have your say.

“If we are unable to secure a new long-haul EBA10 with our pilots that meets the Sunrise investment case within Airbus’ timeframe, we will be left with no viable alternative but to have Sunrise flying performed by a new employment entity that can provide the cost base we need for this important business opportunity,” he said.

Under the pay scale in the proposed agreement, captains would be paid a base rate of $395,000 a year. First officers are in line for $261,000 a year, and second officers $129,000.

Adding to the lack of faith in AIPA relating to lengthening negotiations over the bargaining agreement comes the news some pilots have circulated self-made material telling others to reject the offer Qantas had put on the table.

“You will be working harder than ever before. You will be away from home more than ever before. And, you will be doing it for less money than ever before,” one presentation obtained by AFR said.

The presentation is understood to be one of several negative inter-worker communiques circulating that are unsanctioned by AIPA.

The author of the above presentation wished to remain anonymous for fears of retaliation from management told AFR he remained resolute in their position.

“We work over Christmas, weekends, all through the night, and now they’re asking us to do a flight that is currently illegal, with serious safety questions, and instead they just want to nickel and dime the pilots,” the person told the outlet.

“Qantas pilots in cockpits all over the world will be distracted today and over the coming weeks by Tino’s email and the threat to their jobs.”

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

One response to “Qantas pilots go above union to prevent Project Sunrise take-off”

  1. $400k for a pilot & they want more in a huge recession with Coronavirus meaning there are now 1000s of pilots in China without any work or any pay at all. Are these guys nuts ?

Leave a Reply

News

How Travel Weekly has got your back during the COVID-19 crisis

We’ve come up with a few initiatives to help you recover from the impact of the COVID-19 crisis and come out the other side stronger than ever. Find out what they are here.

Share

CommentComments

Events

Women in Travel Awards winners’ circle: Siobhan Foley, Accenture

Looking for some inspo for your Women in Travel Awards entry? Siobhan Foley’s story will have you hitting ‘submit’ in no time.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Aloha Friday Wrap: Hawaii’s message to travellers, Hawaiian Airlines helps out medical workers + MORE!

This week’s Aloha Friday Wrap details how the US island state and its airline are responding to the COVID-19 crisis, and also provides some holiday inspo for once things return to normal.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

“Aloha from our home to yours”: Hawaii’s message to travellers

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the Hawaii Tourism Authority has asked travellers to postpone their trips to the US island state so it can effectively address the health crisis.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Hawaiian Airlines to support medical workers with complimentary flights

Hawaiian Airlines will provide complimentary neighbour island flights for medical professionals during the month of April to support travel associated with COVID-19 response efforts.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Here’s how your clients can experience Oahu’s rich history and culture

by Ashlee Galea

An integral part of making a Hawaii holiday amazing, aside from beach time and tropical cocktails, is taking a deep dive into the culture and history of the Hawaiian Islands.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Carnival president slams NSW government’s “bitterly disappointing” treatment of cruise industry

by Ali Coulton

Sture Myrmell says the state government is not only putting remaining crew members at risk, but also impacting the cruise industry as a whole.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Qantas under investigation following cleaner’s suspension

Following news that ASIC would investigate Qantas, SafeWork NSW has launched a probe into the suspension of an aircraft cleaner who was employed by the national carrier.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

“The world will soon return”: Abu Dhabi says city’s silence is a time for reflection

by Christian Fleetwood

Abu Dhabi has released a message of hope, looking forward to the moment the emirate can welcome the world again.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

WATCH: Empty Welsh streets taken over by tribe of goats

In the deserted streets of Llandudno in northern Wales, where residents are on lockdown, goats have descended from the Great Orme and into the town.

Share

CommentComments

Technology

Webjet pulls plug on cruise sales business, actions 440-plus redundancies

by Huntley Mitchell

The online travel company has resumed trading on the ASX, but not before detailing some harsh measures to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Marriott suffers data breach involving 5.2 million guests

What started as a headache for Marriott’s boss amid the COVID-19 crisis has turned into a migraine following this unfortunate news.

Share

CommentComments