Aviation

Pilots pressured Boeing to review 737 Max before Ethiopian Airlines crash

Christian Fleetwood

Christian Fleetwood

A damning report published by The New York Times has revealed that Boeing resisted calls by American Airlines’ pilots and aviation experts to review the 737 Max.

This was following Lion Air flight 610 that killed 189 people but between the interim of the Indonesian disaster and Ethiopian Airlines flight 302, where a further 157 people lost their lives.

Weeks after the first fatal crash of the 737 Max, pilots from American Airlines reportedly urged Boeing’s executives to press the Federal Aviation Administration for an ‘emergency airworthiness directive’.

Boeing resisted and said they expected pilots to be able to handle problems related to MCAS – the 737 Max anti-stall system – having been made aware of it, after initially not being informed of the new feature.

Shortly after the Lion Air tragedy, Boeing vice president Mike Sinnett reportedly acknowledged that the manufacturer was assessing 737 Max design flaws, including MCAS.

However, Sinnett urged caution in acting too quickly by rushing to have the jet’s software updated, reminding pilots, professionals and union members in attendance at the meeting that “rightly or wrongly” the design criteria reflected the assumption that flight crews had been trained to deal with situations where the plane’s tail moves in an uncontrolled way due to a malfunction.

A few months later, another Boeing 737 Max crashed, with its entire cabin and crew lost in the disaster, prompting an on-going worldwide grounding of the jet and a review of the fatal system that was found to have caused both disasters.

The future of the jet has been up-in-the-air ever since, with Boeing pledging its absolute support to ensuring the safety of its updated jet, which it claims will be one of the safest ever to fly, but reportedly continuing to face scrutiny over the initial certification of the 737 Max.

After initially backing Boeing with his full support for the re-certification of the jet, Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde Gebremariam back flipped on his initial support by telling NBC News he could not confirm the 737 Max would return to the airline’s line-up.

“At this stage I cannot, I cannot fully say that the airplane will fly back on Ethiopian Airlines. It may, if we are fully convinced and if we are able to convince our pilots, if we are ever to convince our traveling public,” Gebremarian said.

It has also been revealed that Boeing received no new orders for planes in April, including no new orders for 737 Max aircraft since its grounding in March, or the 787 Dreamliner and 777.

Boeing did report some orders for the other jets in late March. Lufthansa ordered 20 of the 787 jets on 15 March, and British Airways ordered 18 of the 777X on 22 March.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Destinations

Tourism

Instagram model slammed for vandalising 200-year-old statue

In what appears to be a desperate attempt for more followers, an Insta model has taken to a historic statue with a hammer, and suffered the consequences.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Qantas passenger accuses airline of “fat-shaming” after being booted from exit row seat

A Qantas passenger has accused the airline of “fat-shaming” and bullying him after being removed from an exit row seat for being too large.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

InterContinental Sydney appoints new PR agency

InterContinental Sydney has chosen a new PR agency, which has already hit the ground running by sending us this announcement.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Virgin Australia culls capacity on Brisbane-Cairns route

Have you recently noticed walking a shorter distance to and from the loo on Virgin’s Brisbane-Cairns flights? Discover why here.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Tourism

Uber launches world’s first rideshare submarine experience to Great Barrier Reef

Ridesharing giant Uber has launched underwater trips. However, will riders receive complimentary bottles of water and breath mints, Travel Weekly asks?

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Agent wrap: Star Wars mega-famil chance, Viking’s Eurovision contest winners + more

This wrap has something in it for agents who love Star Wars and Eurovision, so bad news for those who hate both.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Destinations

Want to be part of The Living Room’s fabulous Tahiti prize?

Air Tahiti Nui is giving away not one, but two prizes via 10’s The Living Room. Sadly, neither of them include hunk o’ spunk Dr Chris Brown.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Technology

Amadeus signs landmark deal with Booking.com to boost accommodation content

Amadeus appears to be the new black in the travel industry, with the tech player announcing yet another partnership.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Flavour of the Week: Hilton appoints new GM, management change at CTM, Tourism Solomons CEO’s new role + more

Here’s the latest movers and shakers in the travel industry. As in those who have new roles – not epic dance moves.

Share

CommentComments

Events

REMINDER: Women in Travel Awards early bird ticket deal ends tomorrow!

You know what they say: the early bird gets the worm. So, consider this a worm of the Megascolides australis species.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Agent disappears after being ordered to pay back clients (and allegedly owing franchisor 40K)

This story has got a bit of a Catch Me If You Can aura about it, minus Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks.

Share

CommentComments

Road & Rail

Rail Europe launches summer special for Great Train Journeys

Once again, there isn’t enough road and rail news for us to deliver you a wrap, but we do have this. Or, you can re-read that bullet train story we did last week.

Share

CommentComments