Aviation

Pilots pressured Boeing to review 737 Max before Ethiopian Airlines crash

Christian Fleetwood

Christian Fleetwood

A damning report published by The New York Times has revealed that Boeing resisted calls by American Airlines’ pilots and aviation experts to review the 737 Max.

This was following Lion Air flight 610 that killed 189 people but between the interim of the Indonesian disaster and Ethiopian Airlines flight 302, where a further 157 people lost their lives.

Weeks after the first fatal crash of the 737 Max, pilots from American Airlines reportedly urged Boeing’s executives to press the Federal Aviation Administration for an ‘emergency airworthiness directive’.

Boeing resisted and said they expected pilots to be able to handle problems related to MCAS – the 737 Max anti-stall system – having been made aware of it, after initially not being informed of the new feature.

Shortly after the Lion Air tragedy, Boeing vice president Mike Sinnett reportedly acknowledged that the manufacturer was assessing 737 Max design flaws, including MCAS.

However, Sinnett urged caution in acting too quickly by rushing to have the jet’s software updated, reminding pilots, professionals and union members in attendance at the meeting that “rightly or wrongly” the design criteria reflected the assumption that flight crews had been trained to deal with situations where the plane’s tail moves in an uncontrolled way due to a malfunction.

A few months later, another Boeing 737 Max crashed, with its entire cabin and crew lost in the disaster, prompting an on-going worldwide grounding of the jet and a review of the fatal system that was found to have caused both disasters.

The future of the jet has been up-in-the-air ever since, with Boeing pledging its absolute support to ensuring the safety of its updated jet, which it claims will be one of the safest ever to fly, but reportedly continuing to face scrutiny over the initial certification of the 737 Max.

After initially backing Boeing with his full support for the re-certification of the jet, Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde Gebremariam back flipped on his initial support by telling NBC News he could not confirm the 737 Max would return to the airline’s line-up.

“At this stage I cannot, I cannot fully say that the airplane will fly back on Ethiopian Airlines. It may, if we are fully convinced and if we are able to convince our pilots, if we are ever to convince our traveling public,” Gebremarian said.

It has also been revealed that Boeing received no new orders for planes in April, including no new orders for 737 Max aircraft since its grounding in March, or the 787 Dreamliner and 777.

Boeing did report some orders for the other jets in late March. Lufthansa ordered 20 of the 787 jets on 15 March, and British Airways ordered 18 of the 777X on 22 March.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Cruise

Cruise Wrap: MSC to launch eco-conscious tours, cruise returns to bushfire-affected NSW South Coast + MORE!

If, like us, you’re avoiding a stockpile of emails accrued over the long weekend like the plague, this week’s Cruise Wrap is the perfect five-minute distraction.

Share

CommentComments

Technology

Sabre announces new deals with two hotel giants

The tech player has eked out fresh partnerships with two hotel behemoths, one of which has been in the news lately for controversial reasons.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Magnitude 7.7 earthquake strikes off the coast of Jamaica and Cuba

An earthquake that triggered a tsunami warning has hit off the coast of Jamaica, Cuba and the Cayman Islands, with reports alleging it was felt as far as Miami.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Aussie travel company shares take a hit amid Coronavirus fears

by Christian Fleetwood

As growing fears of the scale of coronavirus continue to reverberate across the world, Australian travel companies are among those taking hits to their share prices.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Pilot busted for writing racial slurs and pro-Trump graffiti in airport

The pilot was caught allegedly scrawling “TRUMP4EVER” around the airport, among other things. It is not confirmed whether the Trump comment was written inside a love heart with an arrow through it.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Instagrammer accidentally captures penguin porn while trying to take perfect selife

An Instagrammer has admitted to being so caught up in capturing the perfect selfie she failed to notice a pair of fornicating penguins had photobombed her shot.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Carb-themed hotel room opens in New York

If you’re celiac, gluten-intolerant or just trying to avoid deliciously unhealthy food, you should probably skip this one. Or, use it as an excuse to stock up on croissants like we did.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Cruise & Maritime Voyages joins CLIA Australasia, rejoins CLIA Europe

Did you hear champagne corks popping in the CMV offices this morning? Click here to find out why.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

The Travel Corporation’s John Veitch exits

TTC’s Aussie CEO has announced he is flying the coop to take up a role outside of the travel industry.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Midweek Interview with Reef House’s Ben Canham

This week, Reef House’s executive chef cooked us a feast while we picked his brain… just kidding! We devoured an entire tub of hummus and emailed him the questions.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Aviation Wrap: Delta’s world-first parallel reality experience, Boeing’s new jet takes flight + MORE!

With only four days of work, we’re welcoming this week with an Aviation Wrap, a handful of hobnobs and an overwhelming hangover.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Indonesia seeks massive $9.7bn investment alongside ‘10 New Balis’ project

It might be a few years away before you can sell a few equally wonderful alternatives to Bali, but keep these Indonesian destinations on your radar.

Share

CommentComments