Aviation

Overseas arrivals reduced even further at Sydney Airport

Christian Fleetwood

Christian Fleetwood

The number of overseas arrivals flying into Sydney Airport has been further reduced, as the NSW government looks to ease the potential of further pressure on the state health department.

As of today, a total of 350 passengers will be permitted to disembark their international flights at the airport each day.

The move comes just weeks after NSW capped arrivals to Sydney Airport at 450 passengers, following the decision by Victoria to suspend international arrivals to the state in a bid to ease pressure on its under-review hotel quarantine system.

However, it also comes amid fears of a second wave of coronavirus cases across NSW, with the state health authority reporting 62 locally acquired cases in the week to Saturday.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the latest move would be an important measure to ensure returning arrivals do not overrun the capacity of NSW Health and the state’s hotel quarantine.

“NSW is the gateway to Australia and it is important that passengers returning home do not overrun the capacity of NSW Health and hotel quarantine,” the Premier said in a statement.

“The people of NSW have done an excellent job putting us in the position we are in today; however, we must not let our guard down and this decision will further help keep us safe.”

Minister for Jobs, Investment, Tourism and Western Sydney Stuart Ayres said the reduced cap will help the management of hotel quarantine and assist NSW in firing up the economy.

“The people, businesses and industries of NSW can only operate in this ‘new normal’ if we effectively reduce the spread of COVID-19, and further limiting the cap on returning travellers will help ensure this,” Minister Ayres said.

“Australian’s have been given plenty of time to return from overseas, and it is incredibly important the volume of returning travellers does not undo the great work of the people of NSW.”

Furthermore, travellers now arriving in Sydney will be required to foot the bill of their hotel quarantine stay, at the cost of $3,500 for an individual and $5,000 for a family of two adults and two children.

Restrictions tightened for entry to NSW from Victoria

Image source: iStock/hypedesk

Meanwhile, the state has also introduced further restrictions for arrivals from Victoria, including a new border zone along the Murray River and tightened permit conditions.

“The growing rates of community transmission in Victoria have us on high alert and the health advice clearly indicates we need to have stricter border closures in place, making it harder to get a permit and easier to cancel them,” state Health Minister Brad Hazzard said in a statement.

Hazzard’s comments come as Victoria continues to battle a second wave of coronavirus infections, with the state’s health authority reporting 363 new cases on Sunday.

Of the 2,837 COVID-19 cases that remain active across Victoria, 1,028 may indicate community transmission, the state Health and Human Services department reported.

Taking effect from midnight Tuesday, the new border zone will restrict entry to NSW from Victoria to “extremely limited purposes”, with border residents under the new permit required to self-isolate for 14 days if they go further than the border zone.

Any other NSW resident who crosses the river, enters Victoria or has been there in the last 14 days will also need to isolate for a fortnight.

In other news around Australia, Western Australia will implement tougher restrictions on travellers arriving from NSW. The state’s quarantine exemption list has shrunken to only include senior government officials, certain active military personnel, and federal MPs and their staff.

Anyone outside of this list will continue to be required to undergo a 14-day self-quarantine period.

Travellers caught lying at Queensland border could face jail time

Image source: iStock/4FR

In the northeast of the country, border measures have been hardened significantly.

People now caught breaching Queensland’s coronavirus health restrictions could face a six-month jail sentence, following the passing of new legislation that introduced harsher penalties for flouting the rules.

State Health Minister Steven Miles told the press that the prison sentence could be imposed by the courts in serious cases of people flouting the state’s public health directions.

“We take the health of Queenslanders very seriously and our public health directions are in place to limit any potential spread of COVID-19,” Miles said.

“Queenslanders are working hard in following restrictions and health advice.

“We don’t want to see all our hard work undone, and we are very serious about enforcing our public health directions.”

The increased penalty followed several people trying to illegally enter Queensland, after having been in areas designated as COVID-19 hotspots, ABC News reported.

The prison penalty will sit alongside already fines of up to $13,345 for people and businesses caught breaking the rules in the state.


Featured image source: iStock/stellalevi

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Destinations

ScoMo reveals fresh candidates for expanded travel ‘bubble’, including some Chinese provinces

by Ali Coulton

With two-way trans-Tasman travel off the cards for the foreseeable future, Australia’s PM has revealed a few north Asian candidates for an expanded ‘bubble’.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Muslim influencer claims she was kicked off flight because “entitled white man” felt uncomfortable

The influencer said she was removed from a flight following an altercation with a man whose behaviour she claims would have seen her, a veiled Muslim woman, detained.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Australia’s small business ombudsman says travel agent support package is “a matter of urgency”

The calls for ScoMo to get off his backside and announce the lifeline agents so badly need have grown even louder and slightly terser.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Berlin’s new airport opens nearly a decade late and $6.5 billion over budget

You know what they say: better late than never. Well, that’s what we assume the masterminds behind this new airport have been telling themselves for the past eight years.

Share

CommentComments

Events

Tourism Australia’s marketing team recognised with prestigious award

While it’s been a tough year for Australia’s tourism industry, its lead organisation had something to celebrate about on Friday night.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Carnival-owned cruise lines suspend select sailings until November 2021

Another day, another cruise pause update from your trusty buddies at Travel Weekly. You can thank us by sending cupcakes and a bottle of vodka.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Qantas, Jetstar and Virgin ramp up operations in response to NSW-Victoria border reopening

Those living in Mascot and Tullamarine can expect a bit more overhead noise from now on, with Aussie carriers getting busy again between the two states.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

Helloworld acquires cruise wholesaler, renews deal with Qantas

Despite Andrew Burnes not being very smiley in the accompanying photo, you can bet these two very big announcements will have him grinning from ear to ear.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

TravelManagers agent books first Crooked Compass $9,000 lunch

Have you got any high-end clients looking to throw almost $10K at a fancy lunch? Read on and you may just become the second agent to sell one of these luxe trips.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

Trafalgar launches new competition to reward local heroes

Got a hero in your neighbourhood who deserves a holiday? Trafalgar is giving you the chance to reward them handsomely.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

New airline to charge for toilet paper, ditch life jackets and host COVID-friendly flights

by Ali Coulton

This airline is so low-cost that it is leading people to believe it is a parody of Iceland’s now-defunct WOW Air, particularly because of the strange character holding the reins.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Solomon Islands’ tourism board urges government to reconsider planned Facebook ban

The destination’s government ministers appear to have rocks in their heads, judging by this ridiculous plan.

Share

CommentComments