Aviation

New study reveals air travellers’ top concerns

A fresh round of research from aviation’s peak body has reiterated willingness to travel is being tempered by concerns over the risks of COVID-19 exposure.

From a surveyed pool of more than 4,700 travellers, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) found key information it expects will assist in aviation’s restart plans.

According to the research, travellers are taking precautions to protect themselves from COVID-19, with 77 per cent of travellers saying that they are washing their hands more frequently, 71 per cent avoiding large meetings, and 67 per cent having worn a facemask in public.

Some 58 per cent of those surveyed said that they have avoided air travel, with 33 per cent suggesting that they will avoid travel in future as a continued measure to reduce the risk of catching COVID-19.

Travellers identified their top concerns before boarding as being in a crowded bus or train on the way to their aircraft (59 per cent); queuing at check-in, security, border control or boarding (42 per cent); and using airport restrooms or toilet facilities (38 per cent).

The top concerns for travellers once on board aircraft are the potential to sit next to someone who might be infected (65 per cent); using aircraft restrooms or toilet facilities (42 per cent); and breathing the air on the plane (37 per cent).

From the findings, IATA said it was clear that travellers have not made up their minds about cabin air quality.

While 57 per cent of travellers believed that air quality is dangerous, 55 per cent also responded that they understood that it was as clean as the air in a hospital operating theatre.

“The quality of air in modern aircraft is, in fact, far better than most other enclosed environments,” IATA said.

“It is exchanged with fresh air every 2–3 minutes, whereas the air in most office buildings is exchanged two to three times per hour.”

IATA maintains the high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used on modern aircraft capture “well over” 99.9 per cent of germs, and said this extends to the coronavirus.

When asked to rank the top three measures that would make them feel safer, 37 per cent of travellers cited COVID-19 screening at departure airports, 34 per cent agreed with mandatory wearing of facemasks and 33 per cent noted social distancing measures on aircraft.

Passengers have also shown a willingness to play a role in keeping flying safe by undergoing temperature checks (43 per cent), wearing a mask during travel (42 per cent), and checking-in online to minimise interactions at the airport (40 per cent).

Furthermore, travellers are also willing to take a COVID-19 test prior to travel (39 per cent), and sanitise their seating area (38 per cent).

While nearly half of those surveyed (45 per cent) indicated they would return to travel within a few months of the pandemic subsiding, this is a significant drop from the 61 per cent recorded in IATA’s April survey.

Overall, the survey results demonstrate that people have not lost their taste for travel, but there are blockers to returning to pre-crisis levels of travel, IATA said.

A majority of travellers surveyed plan to return to travel to see family and friends (57 per cent), to vacation (56 per cent) or to do business (55 per cent) as soon as possible after the pandemic subsides.

However, 66 per cent said that they would travel less for leisure and business in the post-pandemic world, and 64 per cent indicated they would postpone travel until personal and broader economic factors improved.


Featured image source: iStock/kokouu

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Travel Agents

Flight Centre posts $234m loss, but grows its share in “large and important” Aussie leisure market

by Huntley Mitchell

If you ignore that big negative number in the headline, it’s all very positive news here from FCTG.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Qantas suffers $1bn half-yearly loss, pushes back international flight plans

by Huntley Mitchell

The flying kangaroo won’t be hopping overseas as soon as originally hoped, after posting a “stark, but not surprising” loss.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Brisvegas tapped as preferred host for 2032 Olympic Games

Crack a tinnie of XXXX Gold, because it looks like the Olympics might be coming to Queensland 32 years after Sydney’s hosting efforts.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Carnival Cruise Line extends US pause, as Canadian port closures spark Seabourn, Princess and HAL cancellations

Canada’s obnoxiously handsome PM, Justin Trudeau, has chucked a spanner in the works for cruise fanatics over on that side of the globe.

Share

CommentComments

Technology

Intrepid co-founder backs the Pinterest of travel apps

Getting tired of Facebook’s media ban nonsense? Combine your passion for social media with your passion for travel with this swanky new app.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Why your clients will be drawn to Japan’s heartland once international travel restarts

by Sponsored by Gifu Prefecture Tourism Federation

With your clients no doubt itching to get back overseas, here’s a destination that’s a realistic chance of reopening to Aussies before many others.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

“I thought we were going down”: What we know about the United Airlines engine explosion

The flight was forced to make an emergency landing in Denver when one of its engines blew apart, raining debris on suburban neighbourhoods below.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Royal Caribbean cops further punishment for detaining Aussie cruiser over threesome

The man had already been paid almost $100,000 by the cruise line after being detained by crew members on Explorer of the Seas for six days over false rape allegations.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

Helloworld bears $15.1m loss, but retail networks still “largely intact”

by Huntley Mitchell

Helloworld swung to a loss in the first six months of FY21, but it wasn’t all bad news for the ASX-listed group.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Traditional owners threaten closure of key Kakadu tourism sites over “mismanagement” by Parks Australia

Traditional owners of Kakadu National Park have warned they will close parts of the tourism hotspot after claims it has fallen into “disrepair”.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Marriott names new CEO and president

After the unexpected death of Arne Sorenson last week, Marriott has chosen who will succeed him.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Life in the time of COVID-19 with Global Work & Travel’s Adelle Clements

This week, our editor enjoyed a beachside chat with Global Work & Travel’s marketing manager on the Gold Coast … until he accidentally stepped on a blue bottle.

Share

CommentComments