Aviation

MH370 investigators meet in France

Fran Blandy with Sonia Wolf - AFP

Malaysian aviation experts have met French officials to coordinate the investigation into missing flight MH370, days after the discovery of a washed-up plane part offered fresh hopes of solving the mystery.

The Malaysian team arrived at the Palais de Justice in Paris shortly before 2pm local time on Monday to meet with a French judge, a group of experts and police charged with the investigation.

The meeting ended after two hours and the Malaysian delegation left without comment to waiting reporters.

They were due to release a statement after the meeting.

France is leading the current phase of the investigation after a two-metre-long flaperon, already confirmed to be part of a Boeing 777, surfaced last week on the French Indian Ocean island of La Reunion.

Technical experts, including from US aerospace giant Boeing, will begin from Wednesday examining the wing component, which is likely to have come from the doomed Malaysia Airlines flight as no other such plane is known to have crashed in the area.

Mauritius said it would do all it can to search for more debris after Malaysia appealed to islands near La Reunion to hunt for clues.

In one of the most baffling mysteries in aviation history, MH370 inexplicably veered off course in March 2014 and disappeared from radars, sparking a colossal hunt that has until now proved fruitless.

In January, Malaysian authorities declared all 239 people on board MH370 presumed dead.

The wing part will undergo physical and chemical analysis in the southern French city of Toulouse in a bid to prove beyond doubt that the flaperon once belonged to MH370.

It will be examined with an electron microscope “that can magnify up to 10,000 times” to try to understand how it was damaged, said Pierre Bascary, former director of tests at France’s General Directorate for Armaments.

However, experts have warned grieving families not to expect startling revelations from a single part. “We shouldn’t expect miracles from this analysis,” said Jean-Paul Troadec, former head of France’s BEA civil flight authority.

In order to provide clues on what happened to the aircraft, “the part would need to be at the centre of the accident and the chances are fairly small,” he noted.

Geology expert Hans-Georg Herbig said that the shells encrusted on the flaperon could provide vital clues.

If the barnacles are found to be from the Lepas family, “we can then say with certainty that the accident took place in cold maritime areas to the south-west of Australia,” Herbig said.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Cruise

Dream Cruises begins vaccination of more than 700 crew members

The cruise line is rolling out COVID-19 vaccinations for Taiwan based staff, making it the first cruise company to implement a comprehensive vaccination program in Asia.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Aussie resort crowned Most Romantic Hotel in the World by Tripadvisor

Whip out the rose petals and Möet because the Land Down Under is now home to the most romantic hotel in the world according to this year’s Travellers’ Choice Best of the Best Awards for Hotels.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Virgin pushes back most short-haul international flights, as ScoMo refuses to guarantee quarantine-free travel in 2022

In what shouldn’t come as much of a surprise to you all, Virgin has followed Qantas in adjusting its international restart timeline.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Norwegian Cruise Line introduces first ship as part of new Prima Class

NCL has kicked off its first new class of ships in nearly 10 years with an absolute ripper of a vessel. Get a load of it right here.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

TTC to share its huge DMC portfolio with the wider industry

The Travel Corporation has made the bold move of opening its destination management company portfolio to the rest of the industry.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Ex-airline CEO cops fine for refusing to provide menstrual leave

by Ali Coulton

This former top dog of the commercial aviation world argued that employees failed to provide “proof” they had their period, which doesn’t sound ideal, if you ask us.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

REVEALED: The plan to transform Sydney’s Cockatoo Island

The plan would see the iconic island restored with added art, retail, dining and educational spaces. No word on whether the cockatoos would get a better choice of seeds and berries, however.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Allianz returns to the travel insurance fold

The insurance giant is back to service the travel sector. No word on its court case against ASIC, however.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Qantas delays international restart, as Joyce issues “hermit state” warning

Thought Qantas’ October timeline for the restart of international flights was looking rather precarious before last night’s Federal Budget reveal? Be proven right here.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

CLIA creates new avenue for agents to lobby politicians on Australia’s cruise restart

Have your numerous attempts to highlight the plight of cruising to your local MP fallen on deaf ears? Help has arrived.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Life in the time of COVID-19 with Cunard’s Katrina McAlpine

Cunard’s commercial director had plenty to share during her catch-up with Travel Weekly, including how she once saw a koala walk out of a bar.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

British Airways staff (not actors) front airline’s first ad campaign since 2019

Got a minute to spare? Grab a cuppa and watch British Airways’ snazzy new ad starring the airline’s very own employees.

Share

CommentComments