Wholesalers

Here’s how Intrepid is using seaweed to become climate-positive

Ali Coulton

Ali Coulton

At Intrepid’s Adventure Travel Summit in Buenos Aires last week, the topic du jour was climate-positive action.

You’ve no doubt heard of companies going climate neutral, well, having achieved that goal in 2010, Intrepid recently decided to go one better and set a goal to become climate positive by 2020.

How do they hope to do this? Seaweed. Yes, seaweed. The stuff that holds together your sushi can actually be used to draw down carbon from the atmosphere and significantly reduce methane emissions in livestock when it’s used as feed.

Climate change is a really tricky subject for us to talk about in the travel industry, or own up to perhaps. But what is life without travel?” Gibson told the 75 travel agents selected to attend the summit. 

“That’s why in 2017 the Intrepid Foundation decided to donate $100,000 to get the film 2040 off the ground.”

2040 is a documentary, directed by and starring Aussie actor Damon Gameau, that focuses on 6 solutions to climate change that already have been invented and if implemented on a large scale, could turn the future of the planet around. 

It strays from the doom and gloom tactics usually present when we talk about climate change to present practical changes and a message of hope.

“Intrepid Travel has been carbon neutral since 2010. What we’ve done over those years is spend $1.6 million purchasing renewable energy carbon offsets and guess what? Our business hasn’t gone under. We’re still a very profitable business and we chose to do this voluntarily,” Gibson said.

“We want to have a positive influence on the travel industry, so we’ve made a commitment to become climate positive by 2020.”

According to Gibson, research has suggested that even if every company became carbon neutral, it would be too little too late, so the climate-positive movement is about taking responsibility for extra carbon and drawing it out of the atmosphere.

In April, the Intrepid Foundation partnered with the Climate Foundation to fund research through the University of Tasmania for Australia’s first marine permaculture platform, reaching their fundraising goal of $350,000 in just four months.

With those funds, scientists collected spores from the surviving giant kelp populations to identify individuals that are more tolerant of warming waters. Now, they are breeding those kelp in the lab to prepare for planting into the field.

To continue the project, Intrepid need to raise an additional $250,000 to scale the project and trial marine permaculture systems offshore in Tasmania’s Storm Bay.

It’s not just a step for the climate; it’s a step for sustainable, environmentally-positive aquaculture, local livelihoods and tourism. The project also supports kelp forest restoration efforts by planting warm-tolerant giant kelp on natural rocky reefs.

The best part? Intrepid will match every dollar donated. You can make a contribution to the (re) generation project here.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Tourism

PM the latest to pressure states over border closures, as Qld premier fires back at Tourism Minister

by Christian Fleetwood

ScoMo also talked up the potential of Australians travelling across the Tasman Sea, as the country emerges from COVID-19 restrictions.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

“Lets get out there”: Matt Cameron-Smith talks domestic tourism boom and agents’ role in “de-risking” travel

by Ali Coulton

The AAT Kings group CEO also shed some light on The Travel Corporation’s plan to add more domestic trips across its brands.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

STUDY: Qantas among Australia’s most-trusted brands during lockdown

Despite its wings being clipped by the COVID-19 pandemic, Qantas has still managed to maintain its status as one of Australia’s most-trusted brands.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Dozens of mammoths discovered under future Mexico City airport

Do you consider yourself a bit of a modern-day Howard Carter or Gertrude Bell? If so, this story will definitely tickle your archeological fancy.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Cruise Wrap: PONANT’s new training module, Evergreen’s red-hot offers + MORE

If this week’s Cruise Wrap is anything to go by, the sector is pushing for its return in a big way, rewarding agents in the process.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

ATIC and ATEC launch COVID-safe programs for SMEs

Two of Australia’s industry bodies have developed practical support for businesses during the coronavirus pandemic. However, that’s not to say they copied each other’s ideas.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Life in the time of COVID-19 with Bench Africa’s Cameron Neill

This week, we chat with Bench Africa’s general manager about spicy food, Cirque de Soleil soundtracks and how to potty train a two-year-old.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

John O’Sullivan on Experience Co.’s reset, travel’s recovery and Westbury’s “appalling” comments

by Huntley Mitchell

Travel Weekly has gone one-on-one with Experience Co. CEO and former Tourism Australia boss John O’Sullivan. As in interview him – not verse him in an online game of chess or Battleship.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Labor senator calls for corporate watchdog to investigate Rex

Rex is facing a possible probe from Australia’s corporate watchdog, after its deputy chairman revealed plans for the airline to expand capital city services without informing the ASX.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Australian Border Force extends cruise ban by three months

Those of you who had clients ready and raring to sail out by mid-June may want to prepare a stiff drink before reading this.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Hotel investor Jerry Schwartz proposes helipad for Sofitel Darling Harbour

The prominent Aussie hospitality identity has launched the bold proposal to help revive Sydney’s tourism and conventions profile.

Share

CommentComments

Travel Agents

STUDY: Investing in additional staff training critical for travel industry’s future workforce

Investing in extra training will not only engage staff, but it will also prepare them for the changing landscape of travel, according to new research.

Share

CommentComments