Tourism

17% Aussies have been busted taking ‘inappropriate’ selfies

Amy Bryant

Just yesterday, we wrote about a campaign that encourages travellers to ditch the selfie and actually enjoy the travel experience.

And today, new stats show selfie taking is almost synonymous with travel for many, but is it something we really should be doing, not just for our self-esteem, but for our safety?

Safety should always be put before scoring an epic selfie shot, but the scale of #selfiefails that are occurring, suggests travellers are not taking their safety seriously.

According to Southern Cross Travel Insurance (SCTI), the pursuit for the perfect daredevil picture is costing Aussies up to $200,000.

SCTI’s research also found travellers have become so obsessed with documenting their holiday escapades, 12% admit they would ditch a destination if they couldn’t selfie.

“Selfies have become a huge part of culture and when it comes to overseas holidays, Aussies are hot competition,” CEO of Southern Cross Travel Insurance, Chris White, said.

“Unfortunately for some, selfies are landing them in hot water, from offending locals to hefty medical bills – just about anything can happen if you’re not selfie smart.”

Some of the shocking Aussie Holiday selfie habits that have been found include taking a snap while walking through traffic, next to train tracks and while riding scooters, tuk tuks and rickshaws. And that’s just the half of it.

Research also found people were taking photos while:

  • Mid workout
  • Getting up close and personal with local wildlife
  • Embarking on adrenalin pumping activities, including bungy jumping and sky diving
  • Hiking and climbing mountains
  • Posing with weapons
  • Getting ‘inked’ up with a new tattoo

With many going to extreme lengths for the most insta-worthy picture, travellers are being left reeling when selfies go awry.

From cuts, bruises, broken bones, hospital visits and hefty fines, common mishaps include lost valuables and broken phones (both 18 per cent) while 17 per cent were left red-faced caught doing something they shouldn’t be.

Road accidents, vertigo, dangerous animal encounters and missed flights also made the list. Mishaps were most common in men (14 per cent) and travellers under 30.

Inappropriate selfies landed 17 per cent of Aussies on the wrong side of the locals, with nine per cent also being arrested.

With National Selfie Day coming up on the 21 of June, travellers should be aware of how their endevour for a selfie can be dangerous and irresponsible.

“This National Selfie Day we want to remind travellers with a penchant for selfies to think about the repercussions of their selfie situation,” White added.

“Knowing how your travel insurance policy covers you is key to avoiding any unexpected mishaps.”

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Leave a Reply

Travel Agents

AFTA prompts ACCC to update advice on COVID-affected travel

AFTA boss Darren Rudd has been rolling up his sleeves so much that his buttoned shirt is starting to resemble a tank top.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

More than 100 million tourism jobs could be saved in 2021: WTTC

The Wolrd Travel & Tourism Council reckons the industry is getting ready to pick itself up, shake itself off and sashay towards recovery.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Ardern threatens to delay two-way trans-Tasman ‘bubble’ after Australia halts Kiwi travellers

by Ali Coulton

The prospect of sending your clients to New Zealand in the first quarter of this year has once again been thrown into jeopardy.

Share

CommentComments

Cruise

Norwegian extends cruise suspension

This news isn’t particularly surprising. Unless, of course, you’ve been living under a very large rock.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

Amsterdam may soon ban tourists from its infamous coffee shops

by Ali Coulton

The days of tourists eating space cakes and bogarting joints in Amsterdam’s infamous coffee shops appear to be numbered, following a proposal from the city’s mayor.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

IAG negotiates half-price deal for Air Europa

The aviation behemoth has turned into a bargain hunter amid the COVID-19 pandemic and realised that $1.6 billion is probably too much to pay for an airline right now.

Share

CommentComments

Destinations

New Caledonia Tourism ditches GTI for another local marketing rep

The destination’s tourism board has opted for a ‘French New Wave’ style of marketing, so expect a bit of experimentation and iconoclasm.

Share

CommentComments

Wholesalers

Arcadia Expeditions offers private air tour centred on Indigenous storytelling

Got a client who is looking to learn more about the rich culture of Indigenous Australians, but only want to travel via private plane? Start dialling their number.

Share

CommentComments

Hotels

Historic Southern Highlands property to relaunch as five-star hospitality venue

This soon-to-be-reopened venue even has jail cells. However, that’s not to say they are occupied by any murderers or drug traffickers.

Share

CommentComments

Midweek Interview

Life in the time of COVID-19 with G Adventures’ Dan Coleman

Here, G Adventures’ sales manager for Australia and New Zealand revealed his secret holiday spot … which isn’t really a secret anymore.

Share

CommentComments

Tourism

Tourism Minister eyes potential post-JobKeeper support package for travel industry

Fingers and toes are being crossed throughout the industry, as Australia’s new Tourism Minister provides some hope of targeted government support.

Share

CommentComments

Aviation

Flight evacuated following threatening note

Passengers have been evacuated from a plane at an international airport in the US after flight attendants uncovered a written threat.

Share

CommentComments