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Help Intrepid donate $60,000 to some great global causes

Intrepid Travel is getting into the Christmas spirit with a commitment to donate $60,000 to six projects of the Intrepid Foundation!

From conserving wildlife in Sri Lanka to protecting wildlife Rangers in Kenya, this Christmas travellers can make a difference to communities all over the world simply with one click.

“We can think of no better way to say thank you to our travellers than by allowing them to be an active participant in the important work of The Intrepid Foundation,” Brett Mitchell, Regional Director, Intrepid Group, Asia Pacific said.

“Taking a few seconds out of the day can make a real difference and travellers can choose where Intrepid’s donation goes.

“One click can help save five baby turtles in Costa Rica or support Syrian refugees living in Istanbul through skills development programs and language schools.”

Intrepid will donate $5 on behalf of every person who commits a click and the campaign will run from now until 21 December 2018.

There are six causes from across the world that the public can support with just one click:

Cambodia: Friends International supports youth in Cambodia to build a future. By providing vocational training in tourism, young people are given the skills they need to successfully gain sustainable, fair employment.

Morocco: Education for All provides education to girls in Morocco’s mountains, where access to education, particularly for girls, is not easy.

Some live far away from the nearest school, meaning that even getting to school is a significant barrier.

Education for All manages safe boarding houses, and provides girls with books, uniforms and study support to help their education.

Costa Rica: SEE Turtles protects endangered turtles in Latin America.

The demand for turtle-shell products have contributed to sea turtles declining population.

Donations go towards stopping the turtle-shell trade.

Sri Lanka: Wildlife Conservation Society protects elephants and their habitat.

Human-elephant conflict is one of the biggest environmental and socio-economic crises in Sri Lanka’s rural areas as, each year, large areas of existing elephant habitats are destroyed and converted to agricultural land.

Donations support the livelihoods of local communities while keeping elephants safe from harm.

Kenya: The Thin Green Line Foundation  advocates for wildlife rangers’ safety worldwide. Rangers are on the frontline of conservation.

Without them, there is no one to look after wildlife. That’s why it is so alarming that over 1,000 Rangers have lost their lives in the line of duty – in just a decade.

Donations will support training programs for female Rangers so they, too, have the skills to earn an income and protect Kenya’s incredible wildlife.

Turkey: Small Projects Istanbul supports those affected by war in the Middle East.

Based in Istanbul, they provide skills development training, livelihood support, and supplemental education and language programs.

Donations made to The Intrepid Foundation support the Women’s Skills Development training program to help get women back on their feet.

For more information and to click to donate go here.

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