Travel Agents

75% of Aussies think robots will pinch their jobs

Does the rise of robots, computerised jobs and machines terrify you slightly? Does all the airline chatbots, Wi-Fi in the skies, and threats of OTAs have you a teensy bit nervous for your own job lifespan?

Well, turns out you’re not alone, friends.

New YouGov research reveals almost half of 18-29-year-olds in Australia believe a robot could do their job at least as well as them.

Developments in genetics, artificial intelligence and robotics mean that robots could actually end up destroying livelihoods across vast swathes of the population, with recent research suggesting that about 45 per cent of the activities people are paid to do could be automated over the next few decades.

However, new data from YouGov Omnibus suggest that Aussies are cautiously optimistic about the impact of robots on society.

Overall, nearly two-thirds of Australians believe that robots will make our lives easier and three-quarters agree that robots can do things humans don’t want to do.

Travel industry susceptible to robots

Just a couple of months ago, Air NZ showed us just how easy it is for machines to do human-based roles when it brought a social humanoid robot to Sydney Airport to interact with and assist customers checking in and at the gate prior to boarding.

Meanwhile, at this Japanese hotel, robots run the joint, while businesses from Tigerair to Sabre are all signing up to use chatbots to serve customers.

And that’s not even taking into account a recent Amadeus study that examined the many ways technology would change the travel industry in the not-too-distant future.

Travel agents still have an edge

Thankfully, there’s still plenty of travel bigwigs that reckon agents don’t have anything to worry about. Sure, you may need to up your social media game or get a bit more tech savvy, but the personalised touches of travel agents will keep you in business.

According to Penny Spencer, “travel agents sell time”, and in a world where time is our most precious commodity, that’s a big plus for agencies.

Then Travel Counsellors Managing Director, Fred van Eijk, assured agents that in the face of growing OTAs and things like Google Flights, the one thing that can save agents from extinction is their ability to create and tell stories. As long as you’re not what this article revealed as being ‘a bad travel agent’then your human touch will save you.

“IF A ‘TRAVEL AGENT’ JUST DOES THE BOOKING FOR THE CUSTOMER, THE RISK OF AUTOMATION IS HIGH AND INDEED ALREADY WITH US,” HE ADMITTED.

“We have already seen the development of travel websites, supported by on-line virtual travel agents.

“However, whilst robots may be able to recount a story, they can’t create one.

And of course, we can’t forget this wise piece written by industry legend and ex Insight Vacations CEO, John Boulding, who gave us this reason as to why robots will never replace agents.

Seven in ten would like a robot to do their cleaning

Forget booking travel, the new YouGov study revealed most Aussies are happy to welcome robots into their lives, with less than one in seven saying they would not want a robot.

Out of a list of twelve possible functions, the most popular use for a robot is to help with cleaning the house, which seven in ten would want. Other popular choices include security (chosen by 55 per cent of respondents) and gardening (selected by 43 per cent).

Women and men appear to be in broad agreement about the use of robots for household chores such as cleaning the house, gardening and carrying things. However, they are more divided about the use of robots for more socially-oriented tasks.

Nearly twice as many men would want a robot to assist with care for the elderly (27 per cent of men do, whereas just 15 per cent of women do). Similarly, around a quarter of men would want a robot for companionship, while less than a fifth of women would want the same.

One in 10 believe a robot would do their job better than them

Despite being able to see the benefits that robots could bring, Aussies also recognise the threat they pose to people’s employment prospects; three-quarters of Australians agree that robots will take jobs away from many of them.

However, many do not currently feel personally threatened by robots in the workplace, with only one in ten believing that a robot would be better than them at their job.

Younger generations are less certain of their place at work. While 37 per cent of those aged 18-29 think that a robot would not be better them at their job, nearly six in ten of those over 45 do.

Those under 45 are also more likely to think that a robot could do their job at least as well as them.

Almost half of 18-29-year-olds believe a robot could do their job either the same as or better than them. This is true for 47 per cent of 30-44-year-olds but just 21 per cent of over 45s.

With robots set to shake up our economy there is certainly a challenge ahead.

Nearly eight in ten Aussies agree that robots should be regulated carefully, suggesting that regulators will have to forge a new and difficult path that seeks to maximise the benefits of new technology without reducing citizens’ opportunities and/or income.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

  • Nishita Goyal

    Thanks for writing about bots – Our belief is bots are going to be the defacto interaction channel on the defacto personal device, the smartphone. The technology and potential is still in its infancy with the immediate solves being in interaction design, business cases to apply, removing interaction constraints and acceptance. The big win is that the technology has inherent automation, machine learning and 24 x 7 intelligent availability. We at Engati http://www.engati.com have started the journey and have been rated one of the best open platforms for building bots by Techworld. Do visit us and provide us with your valuable feedback as we strive for more mainstream acceptance of this technology of the future. https://www.techworld.com/picture-gallery/apps-wearables/seven-platforms-for-developers-build-chatbots-3639106/

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